Disproving Christianity is Like Killing a Zombie

Killing a zombie isn’t tricky, but it does require something specific–you have to destroy the brain. You will barely slow a zombie down by breaking his arms and legs. Even if you have a sword, you will have to get dangerously close to becoming a zombie yourself just to remove his limbs. Why not just swing for the neck? Cutting off the head will make the brain an easy target. Or, if you have a gun, you can pump his chest full of bullets, but at best, you will only take a few chunks out of him. He won’t stop coming. Why not just aim for the head? If you kill the brain, you kill the zombie.

If you spend all of your time trying to wound zombies rather than trying to kill them, one has to wonder about your motives. Maybe you are just interested in landing a combination of non-fatal blows that will render the zombie harmless. You don’t need to kill him. If you take out his arms, legs, and teeth, then you can pretty much forget about him. Or maybe you want to send a message to the zombie community at large that they are easy to take apart, and because of this, they ought to just give up.

Disproving Christianity is (a bit) like killing a zombie.[1]  It isn’t tricky, but it does require something specific–you have to destroy the resurrection of Jesus. You won’t deal a fatal blow to Christianity by pointing to difficult passages in Scripture. Even if you have a knock-down argument, you will have to get dangerously close to admitting that the God of the Bible exists, and did the things it says He did, just to argue that He is immoral. Why not just argue that God does not exist? That is like cutting off the head. Or if you have extensive knowledge of Scripture, you can take shots at the Bible by firing off supposed contradictions, but at best, you will only take a few chunks out of the doctrine of inerrancy. As long as the details surrounding the resurrection of Jesus are reliable, Christianity won’t go down. Why not just attack the resurrection? If you destroy the resurrection, you destroy Christianity (1 Cor 15:14). Follow the link to finish reading the article>>> http://www.becauseitstrue.com/2/post/2014/02/disproving-christianity-is-like-killing-a-zombie.html

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Profile photo of Jason Wisdom
I am a husband and father. I teach apologetics, theology, and hermeneutics at a private Christian high school. I run the apologetics website becauseitstrue.com. I am also the chapter director of Ratio Christi at the University of Georgia.

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4 Comments

  1. Profile photo of Todd

    Todd - February 26, 2014, 7:05 am

    What about the atonement? How much of Christianity is left if you destroy that? In some ways it’s an easier target than the resurrection. The whole idea of the fall from grace is puzzling, to say the least. Christians can’t even agree among themselves whether pain and death existed before the fall, which seems to indicate that they can’t agree about what the fall *is*. Moreover, propitiatory substitutionary sacrifice is a very hard sell these days.

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    Jason Wisdom - February 26, 2014, 7:34 am

    Todd, you are right to point to the atonement as central to Christian belief. However, I was not addressing the question of what doctrines comprise the core of Christian belief (and the atonement is definitely one). Rather, I was simply referring to the single linchpin upon which all of Christianity hangs–the resurrection (not just my words, but Paul’s as well). Sure, one’s understanding of the atonement dramatically affects the way he or she views Christianity. And I would certainly argue for a particular view as the correct and historical teaching. Yet, there has been vigorous debate (among Christians) ever since the first century about exactly how to understand the atonement. There are many issues, like the atonement, that are central issues to the historic Christian faith–the backbone of Christianity. Changing one’s understanding on these doctrines changes the shape of Christianity, sometimes dramatically (often leading to heresy), but does not necessarily spell the collapse of Christianity. On the other hand, if Jesus has not been raised; if His bones are sitting around somewhere; then the discussion of which doctrine of atonement becomes utterly meaningless (again, I am appealing to Paul there).

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    Todd - February 26, 2014, 1:35 pm

    That makes sense. I guess I was just thinking about it from the other end, so to speak. If atonement doesn’t make sense, then the resurrection, even if it happened, is just a display of power, with no other meaning.

    Could something like Christianity survive if the atonement doctrine were abandoned? I suppose so, but it would be very different from *most* of what we have.

    Could something like Christianity survive if the bones of Jesus were found? Yes, but it would only be the liberal, naturalistic, form of Christianity according to which Jesus was a wise, but mortal, teacher.

    You might not be willing to call either of these “Christianity,” and you would probably be right.

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      Jason Wisdom - February 26, 2014, 5:14 pm

      Todd, I think we are agreed. I simply think the atonement has a great deal more variations and wiggle room within orthodox Christianity. And, the atonement is not something that can be falsified historically like the resurrection. But certainly, completely disproving the atonement (not just one view on it) would empty Christianity of all hope. Anyway… as I said, I believe we agree here. Thanks for challenging me to think it through some more!

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